Tag Archives: lotto

Bingo – It’s Birth and Beginning

Bingo – It’s Birth and Beginning

The true origin of bingo dates back as far as the mid 16th century and is connected, strangely enough to the unification of Italy in 1530. This unification saw the introduction of a National lottery system, known as “Lo Giuoco del Lotto d’Italia” held each week. Interestingly, this lottery is today a major source of income to the government, contributing over 75 million dollars each year to the budget.
It was the French who developed a passion for “Le Lotto”, as it became known and they adapted their own version of the game that strikes a strong resemblance with today’s version of bingo. Three horizontal and nine vertical rows formed the basis of the card and players would cover their numbers as they were drawn until an entire horizontal row was covered – hence the winner.
Lotto continued to flourish throughout Europe. It was used as an educational tool in Germany to teach children their multiplication tables and even formed the basis of many other games and toys still noticeable in toy stores today. But where and when did Lotto somehow morph into Bingo? Well, the answer lies in what could be described as a compromise – Beano!
Picture the scene. It’s 1929 and a weary and stressed toy salesman by the name of Edwin S. Lowe is driving to Jacksonville, Georgia to prepare for some appointments. Soon after starting his own toy company a year earlier, the market crashed and Mr Lowe’s prospects were looking very bleak indeed.
Before arriving in Jacksonville, Lowe decided to cheer himself up by stopping off at a country carnival, being a night early for his appointments. Only one carnival booth was open and very crowded. The excitement seemed to be generated by a game that was a variation of Lotto, known as Beano. A horseshoe table was covered with numbered cards and beans. Every time a pitchman pulled a wooden disk from an old cigar box and called the number on it, the players reached for a bean and covered the corresponding number on their card, if they had it. When they had totally covered a line, either diagonally, vertically or horizontally, they had to shout Beano! They then received a doll.
Lowe wanted to play, but the game was too popular and no seats were available. What he did notice though was that all the players seemed to be addicted to the game. The pitchman was not able to close and had to eventually chase the players away at 3:00am. The pitchman had apparently picked the game of Lotto in Germany and decided to adapt and bring it to the United States and to rename it Beano. The success of the game on the carnival circuit proved to be highly lucrative.
Back in New York, Lowe invited some friends to his apartment and introduced them to the game. The tension seemed palpable. One time, a player became close to winning and was getting more and more excited. When her final number was called she jumped up in a fit of ecstasy and in all her excitement got herself tongue-tied. Instead of shouting Beano she spat out “Bingo!” Lowe would later describe the “sense of elation” he experienced when he heard her cry. He knew from that moment he was going to introduce this game to the public and name it “Bingo”.
What a success it proved to be for Lowe and his company! As the game came out of the public domain it was hard for it to be trademarked. Entreponeurs emerged from all sides and began their own versions. Lowe graciously asked them to pay just one dollar a year and call their games “Bingo” as well. To avoid litigation, this seemed a small price to pay and hence the massive spread and popular interest in bingo.
Lowe became aware of the fundraising possibilities of bingo after he was approached by a parishioner who wanted to use the game to raise funds. However, there seemed to be a problem when he discovered that each game tended to produce at least a half a dozen winners. Lowe knew that in order for bingo to succeed and a larger scale he needed to develop a greater number of combinations for his cards. So he approached a mathematics professor at Columbia University by the name of Carl Leffler. Lowe wanted 6,000 new cards with different combinations. The professor agreed. What he may not have conceptualised was how much harder each card became to develop than the card before. The fee per card rose to $100 and the task was finally completed, much to Lowe’s delight and at a cost to the professor of his sanity! (Or so many people have speculated).
After that, bingo really began to take off. People started to approach Lowe in droves, asking him to help them develop bingo games. Newsletters and even a book were published. The stakes and prizes got higher and pretty soon bingo took its place in popular American culture along with sports and other forms of gambling and general entertainment.

Don’t Stand in Line; Buy Your Lottery Tickets Online

Don’t Stand in Line; Buy Your Lottery Tickets Online

Have you ever been tempted to play for those life-changing lotto jackpots, but didn’t want to stand in line? The Web could be your ticket.

Lotteries first became popular in the 1970s as an easy way to raise money for state projects and education. Today, 41 states have them in one form or another. But as the jackpots grow, the lines for tickets get longer.

The Internet is emerging as an alternative way for millions to play the odds. One popular site is worldlottery.com, where people from all over the world can try their luck at Mega Millions, Powerball, all U.S. Pick 3 and Pick 4 games and much more.

The site was designed to be easy to use; the interface is simple and there are no large graphics or software downloads to bog down your browser. To get started, sign up by completing a short online registration form and deposit money into your account. Then, simply choose the game you want to play and money will be deducted from your account.

Shortly after official results are posted, the games are scored and prizes are automatically posted to players’ accounts. The site makes it easy to keep track of which games you played and if you won a prize. If you were lucky enough to win a Mega Millions or Powerball jackpot, World Lottery would hold on to your ticket until you provide further instructions.

With World Lottery, die-hard lottery players won’t get frustrated when their daily numbers are drawn in another state. You can match your daily number to as many lotteries as you like throughout the U.S. Not only does this increase your chances to win, but World Lottery pays $600 on the three-digit game – $100 more than the state lotteries pay.

Of course, the lottery experience would not be complete without instant scratch games. World Lottery offers a variety of instant games, like Sweet Success, Hot Cash, Vacation in Paradise and Instant Keno. Those who participate in office football pools will enjoy World Lottery’s Football Pick games.

The principals at World Lottery have been in the lottery business for more than 30 years and pride themselves on customer service. People who register on the site get five free lottery tickets to “try before they buy.”

The History Of Lottery

The History Of Lottery

Lotteries have been with us for a long time. They go so far back that they’re mentioned in the Bible, and Caesar himself is known to have encouraged lottery games in Rome to help pay for repair work that needed to be done in the city. Legend has it that even the Great Wall of China was paid for by the proceeds of lottery games.

In medieval times, Europe was a hotbed of lottery activity. In 1420, residents of the French town of L’Ecluse decided to follow Caesar’s lead by using a public lottery to help raise money; this time to increase the town’s defenses. Charitable causes prompted officials in the Belgium city of Bruges to hold a lottery in 1466 to raise money for the poor and needy.

In the early 16th century, the Italians caught lottery fever when they introduced the idea of a ‘number’ lottery in Florence. Interestingly, the word ‘lottery’ is thought to originate from the Italian ‘lotto’, which simply means “fate”.

Royalty caught on to lottery’s moneymaking potential in 1520, when King Francis I of France held the first ever state lottery. The proceeds went to the Royal Court. Forty years later, in the 1560s, lottery fever crossed the English Channel when Queen Elizabeth I decided to hold her own state lottery to raise money to improve England’s ailing harbors. Her Majesty’s prizes included tapestry and money.

The lottery gained in popularity in England over the next two centuries. The British Museum in London, today one of the finest in the world, was actually started on the proceeds of a lottery in 1753.

Lotteries were particularly popular in the New World in the 18th century. Benjamin Franklin used one to pay for the cannons that helped win the American War of Independence, and they were also used to pay money to the army. The Mountain Road, one of the key routes into the west from Virginia, was paid for with a lottery organized by George Washington.

Individuals were fond of them too; Thomas Jefferson (the third U.S. President) sold most of his property through a lottery scheme. Many of America’s historic colleges and universities were initially set up with the proceeds of lotteries. Most notably, these include many of the universities in the prestigious Ivy League.

Within the last couple of centuries, lotteries have been legalized and implemented in pretty much every country in the world. As the numbers of people playing become bigger, so do the prizes; a jackpot in the USA’s Big Game lottery in 2000 reached $363 million.

Bingo History: Story of the Game Bingo

Bingo History: Story of the Game Bingo

The origins of contemporary bingo go back to 16th century Italy, where the lottery game Lo Giuoco del Lotto dItalia was introduced. The popular chance game was introduced to North America in the late 1920s by the name of Beano. A toy salesperson of New York was responsible for changing the name of the game into Bingo and to the increase of its popularity throughout the US.

In the late 18th century, the original Italian lotto game made its way to France. Historical evidence shows that a game called Le Lotto was popular among the French high society who used to play the game in parties and social gatherings.

Le Lotto used to be played with special cards that were divided into three rows and nine columns. Each of the three columns consists of 10 numbers, while each column had five random number and four blank spaces in it. Each player had a different lotto card where he used to mark the number announced by the caller. The first player to cover one row won the game.

By the 19th century, the lotto game spread around Europe and started to serve as a didactic childrens game. In the 1850s, several educational lotto games had entered the German toys market. The lotto games purpose was to teach children how to spell words, how to multiply numbers, etc.

By 1920s, a similar version to the lotto game, known as beano was popular at county fairs throughout the US. In beano, the players placed beans on their cards to mark the called out number. The first player who completed a full row on his card, used to yell out Beano!, until one night in December 1929, when a New Yorker toys salesperson by the name of Edwin S. Lowe visited a country fair outside Jacksonville, Georgia.

On his way back to New York, Lowe had purchased beano equipment including dried beans, a rubber numbering stamp and cardboard. At his New York home, Lowe has been hosting friendly beano games. During one game, one excited winner who had managed to complete a full row stuttered out Bingo, instead of Beano. Listening to the excited stuttering girl, Edwin S. Lowe thoughts went away. Lowe decided to develop a new game that would be called Bingo.

While Lowe’s Bingo game was making its first steps in the market, a Pennsylvanian priest asked Lowe to use the game for charity purpose. After a short tryout period, the priest had found out that the bingo game causes the churches to lose money. Since the variety of bingo cards was limited, each bingo game ended up in more than five winners.

In order to develop the game and to lower the probabilities of winning, Lowe approached Prof. Carl Leffler, a mathematician from Columbia University. Leffler was asked to create bigger variety of bingo cards that each of them will have unique combination of numbers. By 1930, Lowe had 6,000 bingo cards and Prof. Leffler went insane.

Since then, the popularity of the bingo game as a fundraiser continued to grow. In less than five years, about 10,000 weekly bingo games took place throughout North America. Lowe’s company grew to employ several thousands of employees and to occupy more than 60 presses 24 hours a day.

Now, bingo is one of the most popular chance games in the world. It is played in churches, schools, local bingo halls and land based casinos in the US, the UK, Australia, New Zealand and other parts of the world.

New York State Lottery

New York State Lottery

If you are lucky enough to win the New York State Lottery, it could make you the very next king of the hill! The New York State Lottery is not only one of the largest but one of the oldest state lotteries here in the United States. New Hampshire takes the prize for having the oldest lottery.

The New York State Lottery runs three jackpots, about a dozen scratch-off games and five daily drawings though 15,000 retailers and approximately 14,000 online outlets.

The establishment of the New York State Lottery was made by the new state constitution which was passed in 1966. Just about one third of the lottery’s revenue, which results in $2 billion a year, goes directly to the support of New York City Education. The New York State Lottery also awards scholarships to the Leaders of Tomorrow to one eligible graduating senior who is chosen from each private and public school in the state. The only stipulation to accepting this award is that they must attend New York universities.

There are several games that can be played in the lottery. Here are a couple of the favorites and how to play them:

Take Five – Visit any New York State Lottery retailer and ask for a playcard. Choose 5 numbers that go from 1 to 39 and fill in the squares you have chosen as instructed on the playcard. You may also select the Quick Pick option which saves you a lot of time and let the computer randomly select the numbers for you. Each playcard contains 5 game panels so that means that you can get to play up to 5 times on each of your playcards. The minimum cost is $1 for 1 game. Of course, you can play up to $5 if you choose the 5-game playcard. Choose the number of drawing that you want to participate in. Seven drawings in advance can be played – all on one ticket. Return your playcard to the retailer and you will get a separate ticket for each processed playcard. Always check your tickets to make sure that the dates and numbers that are printed are correct. That’s all there is to it. Now all you have to do is sit back and wait to see if you are the lucky winner! The live TV drawings take place at 11:21 P.M. You can play every day from %:30 A.M.

Quick Draw – The next exciting game to play in the New York State Lottery is Quick Draw. There are a variety of ways you can play this game. You are the one to select the amount to play, the odds as well as how much you can win! On Quick Draw you decide how many numbers you wish to play. Then, select up to 10 numbers ranging from 1 through 80. You can wither choose the Quick Pick Option or make sure that you choose the same amount of numbers that you had chosen in the first section. Check off the amount you wish to wager per game and then decide on how many games you wish to play; then after everything is completed hand your playcard back to the Quick Draw retailer. Every four minutes the New York State Lottery’s computer randomly picks 20 numbers from the field of 1 through 80. They will then appear on the Quick Draw monitor. You are a winner based on how many of the numbers you match. You will find the Quick Draw game wherever you are having fun whether it is at a restaurant, bowling center, bar or another game center. Terminals stay open from 5:30 A.M. to midnight to accept your wagers. There are nearly 3,000 licensed locations at which you can play Quick Draw.

New York state lotto – the classic. Pick up a playcard with 10 game panels. Each panel shows squares numbered 1 through 59. Pick 6 numbers from 1 through 59.Using a black pencil or a black or blue ballpoint pen (red ink will not be accepted), fill in your choice of any 6 of the 59 numbered squares in a game panel. Or save time by choosing Quick Pick and letting the computer randomly select numbers for you. The minimum play is $1 for two (2) game panels. Or you can play up to $5 on the 10-playcard.

It’s all in the luck of the draw. Do you feel lucky? Then try the New York State Lotto today!

Bingo

Bingo

There are many indoor games we enjoy playing during a get-together, or any other occasions. Bingo is one such game that is fun to play. Numbered balls are drawn at random and players cover the corresponding numbers on their cards. It is a prize game, played mostly in halls or any other place. The bingo play cards are designed with numbers on them in a 5×5 grid matching to the five letters of the word BINGO. It is also called a game of chance, where players are awarded prizes for being the first to complete a specified arrangement of numbers on the bingo card, based on numbers selected at random.

Bingo is a derivative of lotto, a lottery game which was first started in 1530 in Italy. Later, in 1778, it grabbed the interest of people in France. The playing card used here was divided into three horizontal and nine vertical rows. Each horizontal row had five numbered and four blank squares. No two lotto cards were alike, and the chips were numbered from 1 to 90. The caller would call out a number while drawing a numbered token. The player who completed the horizontal was declared the winner.

In US this game is primarily staged in churches or charity organizations. In some states these games are conducted in bingo halls which are rented by sponsoring organizations. Commercial bingo games in the US are primarily offered by casinos. In the 1800s educational lotto games became popular. The German lotto was designed to teach tables to children.

This game was once considered the game of old ladies, but nowadays it attracting people of both sexes and all ages. In the early 20th century this game became popular in Australia. It was called Housie, and before conducting it in halls it was held in large canopies. The winner of the game was called House.

Now this game is so popular that whenever you have a gathering or a get-together, people would opt for Bingo as the best way to pass the time.

Making A Business From The Lottery

Making A Business From The Lottery

Do you know that the worldwide lottery market itself is colossal, with countless millions of people buying lottery tickets every day of the week. In the UK alone, it´s estimated that 20 million regularly play just the National Lottery´s games. That is 48% of the adult population, spending in excess of £1 billion GBP per year. That is $1.9 billion USD!

The whole Internet gambling market (of which lotteries are part) is on a winning streak, you could say. Analysts project that annual revenue of $7.4 billion USD in 2004 will soar to $18.3 billion USD by 2010.

Well, the whole Internet gambling market (of which lotteries are part) is on a winning streak, you could say.

It is three Mega Trends working together to give everyone a chance to start a business in this area.

1. Online Lotto and Gaming
2. Working from Home
3. The Internet Explosion

For example, one of the big companies working with the UK National and EuroMillions Lotto have members registered in 127 different countries already, there´s proof enough that the whole planet is your sales territory… And that you can build a genuinely global Internet-based business right from your home.

Also, the Internet is spreading very fast and the number of people connected to the Internet is really huge. You don´t need to have broadband for this kind of work even if it helps to have a fast Internet connection.

If you are not connected to the Internet, rather unlikely as you read this, you can still have an offline business with a lottery. There are several companies that have affiliate systems to help the members promote the business, online as well as offline. Many affiliates make a very good income from the business, some make over $100,000 USD per year.

The requirements for a good business is there, a genuine consumer demand for the product.

Many that join the syndicate systems do it to increase the chances of winning and as a side effect they take the chance to make some extra just by telling friends and others about the choice they made. Then they are on their way to a great income, even a new job or hobby.

This kind of products would sell well worldwide even if it was not promoted purely through an affiliate program, as it is. The products are exposed indirectly — meaning the lottery games themselves — to tens of millions of people on TV and in other mass-media. Imagine the kind of headlines running all over the globe for the moment when the EuroMillions Jackpot has rolled a number of times.

Now in the beginning of November 2006 the Jackpot is £100 million GBP! That is $190 million USD! These kind of numbers makes it easy to promote the games, it´s a fact that you benefit from a rolling free advertising campaign.

The History Of Everyone’s Favorite Game – Bingo

The History Of Everyone’s Favorite Game – Bingo

The earliest Bingo games were played in Italy, somewhere around the year 1530, and played a role in the unification of the country. At that time, Italy started its own lottery system, called Lo Giuoco del Lotto d’Italia, which was done on a weekly basis. Surprisingly enough, this lottery is still around today, and is one of the major sources of income for the government of Italy, bringing in approximately $75,000,000 every year to the national budget.

In those early days, the game of Bingo was known as Le Lotto, and soon became very popular in France as well. The version that France adopted was slightly different than the Italian game played in 1530, and was actually pretty similar to the Bingo games that we play today. Each participating Le Lotto player was given a card with three lines going across, and nine lines going up and down, and as numbers were called, players covered up their cards. The player who was able to fill a row all the way across was declared the winner.

Other European countries soon started playing their own versions of the game. Teachers even used their own version to help children living in Germany learn multiplication. At this time, the game was still known as lotto, and went on to be used in many teaching and educational tools throughout the years.

After being dubbed Lotto, the game eventually was called Beano, before finally being dubbed Bingo many years later. The original game of Beano was often played at carnivals and fairs, and consisted of a horseshoe table with cards on top. Players would claim a numbered card, and the game leader would call out numbers, much as they do in Bingo today. As the numbers on the cards were called, those players would place a bean on top of the corresponding number on their cards.

The first player that covered one full line was declared the winner, and got a prize, which was usually a small doll. A toy inventor and salesman known as Edwin Lowe happened upon one of these games in 1929, but was unable to play because there were so many people lined up at the booth. When Lowe went home, he constructed his own version of the game, and invited friends and colleagues over to give it a try. Of course, the game was a big hit, and the more people played the more they wanted to keep playing.

During one of these games, one player got so intense that rather than yelling Beano when she had filled her line, she called Bingo, giving Lowe the idea to name his version of the game Bingo.Lowe soon became a successful toy salesman, and actually sold the rights to his game, so that other inventors could make their own versions, but keep the same name. Bingo soon spread like wildfire throughout the United States, thanks to Lowe’s insight in letting others use the same name.

Soon, people started using Bingo for fundraising events, which really helped increase its popularity. Lowe played an integral role in inventing and developing many other Bingo-style games as well, all leading up to the game of Bingo that we all know and love today.

The History Of The Bingo Game

The History Of The Bingo Game

The bingo game is one of the most popular games in the world today. Most people are familiar with bingo games in town halls. Now there is a relatively new trend – the online bingo game.

Have you ever wondered where it all started?

The modern day bingo game was originally a form of lottery. When Italy was united in 1530, the government instituted the Italian National Lottery. The Lottery has been held almost every week since then. Today the Lottery is absolutely indispensable to the Italian government – earning more than $75 million yearly!

In 1778 Lotto caught the attention of the intellectuals. The classic Lotto game consisted out of a card that was divided into three horizontal and nine vertical rows. Each horizontal row had five numbered and four blank squares in a random arrangement. The vertical rows contained numbers from 1 to 10, the second numbers from 11 to 20, continuing up to 90. All the Lotto cards were unique. Players would be dealt a single lotto card, whilst someone would draw chips, marked from 1 to 90, from a bag and read the number aloud. Players covered the numbers on their cards if it were read. The first player to cover a complete horizontal row was the winner. In the 1800’s educational games became popular. Lotto games were adapted to teach children spelling, multiplication tables, animals and history. Even today, in the very competitive toy and game market, similar games are popular.

One evening in December 1929, toy salesman Edwin S. Lowe stopped at a carnival a few miles outside Jacksonville. Everything was closed except for one booth. The booth was packed with people. Someone would draw numbers from a bag and read it aloud. The players would all check their cards to see whether they got the number. The winner was the first person who filled a horizontal, vertical or diagonal row of numbers and yelled “Beano”. The winner would than receive a small Kewpie doll as price. As you can guess, this game was called Beano.

Lowe, who has owned his own toy store for about a year, saw the potential of the game immediately. Back home he bought some card and a rubber number stamp and produced his own beano game. Testing it on his friends he soon realized that the game was almost addictive and lots of fun. When one of his friends yelled Bingo instead of beano he knew he had found the name of his new game!

The first Lowe bingo game had two variations – a 12 card set for one dollar and a 24 card set for two dollar. The game was an instant success and soon became popular. Of course he was not the only one to recognize the potential of the bingo game. Many imitators soon tried to market the game. Lowe could not patent the game, but offered to pay his competitors $1 if they would call it Bingo.

A few months later Lowe was approached by a priest from a small parish. Someone in his parish suggested that they use the bingo game as a fundraiser to help the church out of its financial trouble. The priest bought a few sets of Lowe’s bingo game, but unfortunately always had six or more winners.

Lowe immediately saw the potential expansion of the game, but also knew that a huge variation of numbers for the bingo cards will have to be developed. He asked an elderly mathematics professor at Columbia University, Carl Leffler, to devise 6,000 new cards with non-repeating numbers. The professor agreed for a fee for each new card. But, as the professor continued, he found that it became increasingly difficult to produce new bingo cards. Lowe was impatient and at the end he paid Leffler more than $100 per new bingo card. Finally the task was completed, but rumor had it that the professor lost his sanity!

Soon the bingo game was one of the most popular games in North America, and it remains so until today. Many associate it with fundraising, but today Bingo is much more than a fundraiser in church halls.

About ten years ago the online bingo game was developed. Within five years it became even more popular than going to the movies or concerts! Many would agree that online bingo games are the best thing since sliced bread.

Of course online bingo is much more than just a game. It is a place to be with friends and to relax. Who would have guessed that one of the best games ever had such a long history?

Totescoop6 ~ The Horse Racing National Lottery

Totescoop6 ~ The Horse Racing National Lottery

Perhaps like me you shared in the jubilation of Agnes Haddock as Taranis came to win the totescoop6 handicap hurdle at Sandown last Saturday. By selecting the winner, Agnes secured herself a £248,288 bonus to add to the £410,332 she won by completing the totescoop6 the previous week. This king’s ransom came out of a workmanlike £2 bet.

To win the totescoop6 prize fund a punter must pick the winners of six selected races on a Saturday.

Channel 4 had a camera fixed on Agnes as the race unfolded, and as Taranis jumped to the front at the last hurdle, viewers witnessed as her expression turned from one of hope and yearning to sheer exaltation at the line. Fantastic television!

My wife and I hugged each other and we were genuinely thrilled for the laundry woman from Cheshire. “It’s like she’s won the Lottery” said my wife. “No it’s not!” I contested, “It takes skill and judgment to pick the right horses – the Lottery only needs you to pick 6 numbers at random.”

The irony of Agnes’ win was not lost on me: this luckiest of lucky ladies had picked her horses purely on folly, or because the names appealed to her!

Her first selection Simon won at 7-1 in the 2.25 at Southwell. Agnes said: “I picked it because I used to work with a really nice lad called Simon.”

Her second choice was Exotic Dancer which Agnes chose because she had backed it previously, and it trotted up at 6-1 in the 2.45 at Cheltenham.

She got inspiration for the third winner — 6-1 Clouding Over in the 3.05 at Southwell — because it started to rain when she went into a BetFred bookies to place her bet!

Her fourth choice, Mountain, was a non-runner so her money automatically went on the favourite, Katchit – which won in the 3.30 at Cheltenham at 2-1.

Agnes’s fifth and sixth horses Haggle Twins and Whispered Secret both romped home at 8-1. And finally… she arrived upon Taranis to carry her hopes for the Bonus because it was the number thirteen horse, and her birthday is the thirteenth.

Despite this fairytale win, I maintain that although the Scoop6 is the horse racing equivalent to the National Lottery, there are several distinct differences. The totescoop6 offers far better value than the Lottery. Serious punters can win a huge return on a tiny stake.

Although there is the argument that all sorts of charities benefit from the Lottery, it is strictly for mug punters. Unfortunately for the charities and Camelot, these punters are in short supply nowadays as more and more people are not in it to win it any longer. By contrast, 100,000 players every week are investing in the Tote Scoop6, in the belief that they are in control of their destiny regarding the wager. To an extent, they are correct, and they certainly have far more control than is the case in the National Lottery.

Odds of more than 14 million to one govern the Lotto, whereas Tote Scoop6 punters can reduce their odds dramatically, by making their own decisions regarding the horses that they nominate to carry their cash.

Returning to the basics of probability, the realistic price of selecting the first ball that drops out of the Lotto machine is of course 48/1 whilst (taking form analysis out of the equation) the price of any horse to win a ten-runner event (as an example) is 9/1.

To summarize, and this is only my tongue-in-cheek opinion, the Lotto balls are for losers, and fair-play to Agnes Haddock for winning the totscoop6!

About the author: Max Redd has been making a living betting on horse racing for over 10 years. He runs the Redd Racing betting advisory service which offers members a FREE trial and a 60-day money-back profit guarantee.