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Misconceptions With Your Art’s Value

Misconceptions With Your Art’s Value

Knowing the value of art can require some skill and
experience. If you’re starting on a collection and do
not know how to value art, then lucky you, since you
can always get the help of an art appraiser. However,
if you decide on pursuing the value for yourself, then
be sure that you avoid making some of the common
mistakes regarding the matter.

Most people seeking the value of a piece tend to
simply look at the price list and from there on,
conclude the value of the work in consideration.
However, there is much to value than simple market
prices. Pricelists can be very misleading, since
artworks’ values are not only determined by its price;
here are some of the reasons why, and some other
overlooked factors when valuating an art.

It’s A Bargain!

Sometimes, if an auction is poorly publicized, they
hold sales or bargains in order to sell. Thus, you can
find great art that are priced way low from their real
value in this kind of auctions. There are also
instances in which only single bidders are able to
recognize the significance of the art at hand. During
this kind of situations, the piece can also be sold at
a low price if there are no other bidders who want to
pursue the piece. No Auction Records

There are instances too in which the significant works
of a certain artist have never been sold in any kind
of auction. It’s quite normal for the finest and
popular pieces by an artist to sell for huge amounts
of money, approximately tens of thousands or even
more, at galleries. However, that same artist can have
high auction records only in level of low or
mid-thousands of bucks. Thus, if your artist has not
had any significant work of his through any auction,
then you can also value the work extremely low.

Great Continuums

It can also be hard for you to value the piece if the
price range of the artist is too great. For example,
an artist can have hundreds or even thousands of
auction records, ranging for instance in between
$1000-$200,000. If you are not a competent
professional appraiser, for sure you’ll probable have
little or even no idea where the piece would fit in
with a continuum that is vast as that.

Significance Is The Key For an artwork to be
accurately valued, its significance should be
determined. Thus, you should get to know how the piece
would level in respect to how excellent, well, or bad
it is done, compared to the other works of the same
artist. Techniques used in the piece and its overall
aesthetics play a role here. So, if your piece at hand
is really good, yet you’re not able to know or see how
good it is, then for sure you’re going to value it way
low from its justified value.

Unearthing History Matters

Additionally, historical significance would also
matter in valuing your art. The more it is
historically significant, the higher its value is.
Factors like the piece being able to transcend its
artist due to what it represents, when it was created,
where it was done, and other similar mitigating
aspects, play a role with its history significance.
Thus, if you haven’t uncovered the historical
significance of your art, then it would probably have
a low value for you.

Art Auctions on eBay

Art Auctions on eBay

I’ve been looking at art auctions on eBay all day today. I have found some wonderful things. I browsed the Art category and chose the subcategory of self-representing artists.

I like what I see for sale. Art auctions on eBay are a great way for an unknown or even a known artist to sell their paintings. I found some nice paintings in the featured section.

Since I was looking at art auctions on eBay, I used the option to just view the picture gallery. I’m glad I did that because I really just wanted to see the art, not the title of the auction. What immediately caught my eye was all of the bold colors.

On the first page of image results of art auctions on eBay, there was a beautiful painting of a martini. I think that martini images seem very classy to me. I can visualize this painting in the home of someone with a glass coffee table and a leather couch!

The virtual foot traffic that art auctions on eBay gets is incredible. The artist can get so much more exposure to so many more people than hanging their paintings in galleries. It is just such a good way to get discovered.

I did think it was a little funny when I saw art auctions on eBay listed for 99 million dollars. The artist wants to make history by breaking the world record for the most paid for a painting by a living artist. The record is currently forty million dollars.

There was another art auction on eBay that really caught my eye. The artist was Kelly Shanks and she lives in Boston. The painting that I saw was done in an impressionist style and called Neon Rain. It is part of her New Orleans series. I liked it a lot.

I found an art auction on eBay for a painting entitled The Egg Eaters. It was really odd and didn’t exactly suit me. I tried to imagine where it would end up hanging. I think that fantasy art just can’t hang everywhere. I can see this hanging in an upscale gaming store or in a bachelor pad.

The funniest art auction I saw on eBay was for a folk art rendition of a Jack Russell terrier. I can only imagine that a dog lover should own and display this. The dog looks like he is about to jump up on me!

I found a landscape that I really liked when I was looking through the art auctions on eBay. The piece was called Red Barn under Praire Clouds. I think that if this was hanging in my bedroom, I might never get out of bed. I love to watch clouds.

I guess I just don’t understand abstract art. I think if I understood it, I could appreciate it. I found an art auction on eBay for an original painting called Beige Dancelines #2. The artist says that it is an abstract dancing figure. I just can’t see anything but an oversized ear.

There were so many photos to look at when I was searching on eBay for art auctions. I think that my tastes really run to realism and landscapes. I especially liked a painting of Alaska by Hunter Jay. The blues in the picture were really nice; I’ll bet that this painting is wonderful in person.

My mother-in-law has been decorating her house slowly. I found a really nice art auction on eBay for her that would fit her likes. The painting depicts a tree at sunset and is just beautiful. The artist has a lot of auctions and I really hope that she sells a lot. She is very talented.

The only other art auction on eBay that I spent a lot of time looking at was a painting of red tulips against a yellow sky. I’m not sure why I was so taken by this painting. Tulips are my favorite flower. The tulips in this painting are just suspended in the center. They just seem to hang there magically. I really liked this depiction of my favorite flower.

Art Prints—Finding The Best Value

Art Prints—Finding The Best Value

You’re not in college anymore, and it’s time to take down the posters and replace them with original art. But, you don’t have the money yet for oils or watercolors. Art prints are an affordable alternative, yet they too can be pricey. How can you tell if that art print that’s caught your eye is more than just another pretty face?

Art prints are works of art in and of themselves, and may be handmade by artist-printmakers (artists’ prints), digitally printed (giclée), or photomechanical reproductions (offset lithographs).

Artists’ prints are handmade and are not reproductions of paintings: the print is a unique work of art. The term covers a range of printmaking techniques such as etching, woodcut, engraving, screenprint and linocut. Editions tend to be less than 200, partly because the materials used to make the prints wear out. This type of print is sometimes called an “original print.”

Limited edition reproductions are multiples copies of the same image, but produced in guaranteed limited numbers. This makes the image more exclusive. The market price can rise over time, if demand outstrips supply. Edition sizes vary but are limited by market forces, not by the physical constraints of the printmaking method. Most limited editions are signed and numbered in pencil by the artist with a commitment that no other reproduction of the image will be made.

An open-edition reproduction print can be produced in any quantity and the image may also be used in other ways, such as on tableware. Open editions tend to cost less than limited editions and are much less likely to increase in value.

Giclée prints are made using digital printing technology, usually inkjet. The technology enables users to produce small runs of prints. It also allows retailers to offer ‘print on demand’ services, where buyers select an image and it is printed out there and then.

Several factors influence the price of art prints:

Artist and Rarity
Certainly the name of the artist is a major contributor to value. But the art prints of even the same artist may have widely ranging prices. This added value is due to rarity. The more valuable print may be part of a limited edition run of only a few copies, while the more affordable from a larger open-edition run. But they are both original pieces of art by the same artist. It’s a good idea to be well acquainted with the works of a particular artist and his or her peers as well. Research into an artist’s place in the art world will help you ensure you’re getting a good value.

Editions, Signatures and Seals
Before the twentieth century artists did not routinely number nor sign their prints by hand. A signature can come from the plate but is not much of a value. What counts is an individual signature of the artist on the print, usually with a pencil (ink would eventually fade). Modern art prints are often numbered by the artist himself, i.e., “34 / 100” (number 34 out of an edition of 100).

Condition
It’s not unusual for older art prints to have some flaws. If there aren’t any, check again! It might be a reproduction. While minor flaws such as slight soiling are considered normal, depending on age, other defects, such as trimming into the image or heavily faded colors, can reduce the value of a print considerably.

Quality of Impression
Prints taken early from a plate or woodblock are more precise and detailed in lines than later impressions. Depending on the technique, a block/plate is worn out after a certain amount of impressions. Hardly more than 2,000 impressions could be taken from a woodblock without a rather visible deterioration of quality. Look to the numbering (i.e., 15 / 450) to determine what place in the run the print had.

Size
Larger prints tend to cost more than smaller ones. This rule of thumb is less valid for older prints than for modern ones.

Provenance
Provenance, or the item’s ownership history, can influence value. Prints from a famous collection will usually yield a premium.

Subject
Although a matter of opinion and personal taste, the subject of a print has a great influence on value. You’ll pay more for cute animals, pretty women, nice landscapes, interesting portraits. Commercially non-appealing subjects are ugly, gloomy, or war-related, no matter how classically significant the work is. After all, it’s being bought to put on the wall. People will pay more if they like the image.

In the end, it’s your own opinion of the value of the print that matters the most. You’ll be happiest with an art print that you personally like. Although art prints can sometimes be a good investment, the best way to get the most for your money is to enjoy it every day as it graces your home. The value of that? Priceless.

Supplies Used For Creating Art

Supplies Used For Creating Art

Many artists will display their artistic abilities at an early age. These are children that often use walls as a canvas and might choose to use various shades of color that could come from a variety of pencils, pens and crayons that they find at eye-level throughout the home. The art that they create might not be purchased by a local art gallery but it may be photographed and placed in a family album.

Some artists will choose to buy their art supplies from a local craft store. These stores tend to have a larger selection of paints because the paints can be used on a variety of projects that are for sale in the store. The selection of paints might be offered in tubes that can dispense paint onto boards where they can be combined with other colors as the artist paints a variety of images on a variety of materials.

The mediums used to display art can be canvas that is framed and offered in various sizes, or a sketch pad that is specially formulated to allow lead to adhere to the surface or be smudged a bit when the artist wants to show a bit more detail in the art that they are creating. The artists will be supplied with many types of lead to create silhouette paintings or landscapes that are roughly finished.

Many artists treat all of their supplies in a haphazard manner. Many friends might relate this treatment of the supplies as a form of creative expression. The artist always seems to know where to find the supplies that they need to accomplish any form of artwork that they are hired to make. A creative artist may have learned to improvise on supplies at times because they have not had a paying customer in a while.

Some artists prefer to sketch images out in rough draft before they apply those images to canvas. Canvas paintings are usually very expensive and artists will usually reserve their best paints to achieve a beautiful painting in the end. These pieces of art will usually be placed in real wood frames and later sealed on the back to project a professionally finished project that is ready for hanging anywhere.

An artist will keep a ready supply of all of the instruments that they use on a day to day basis including tools for sculpting and those tools and special pens that are used to write calligraphy. Every artist will always maintain an arsenal of brushes that they will use to apply a varied amount of colored paints to many surfaces. Some of those brushes will be synthetic and the better brushes will be made from horsehair.

Every artist will keep their best paintings in a portfolio that will be used to present art to customers. These protective folders are quite large in size and the artist can always be sure that the paintings remain safe inside when they tie the strings of the portfolio together and use it as a handy strap to carry the portfolio from one location to another. An artist will place a lot of value into the supplies they own because these supplies are the method that allows them to be creative.

Art Myths Debunked

Art Myths Debunked

Assumption: Art becomes more valuable once an artist dies.

Actuality: Prices escalate only when demand is greater than supply. Prices can increase if there was a shortage of the artist’s work prior to his or her death and if the demand continues to be significantly greater than supply. Art News (November 2003) presented an article on the ten most wanted artworks. These would sell individually for more than $5 Million IF the present owners would let me them go. However, as the collectors know they could not acquire a replacement painting/sculpture/drawing, they won’t be selling these artworks.

Assumption: An artist’s proof is more valuable than a print from the regular edition.

Actuality: Artist’s proofs are routinely consistent with the regular edition in appearance and value. On rare occasions, a color trial proof be judged to be more valuable than the regular edition or an artist’s proof. this happens when the reigning experts determine the color trial proof represents a more handsome product than the regular edition or artist’s proof.

Assumption: It’s just a print.

Actuality: Some artist’s do or do not choose to paint. Their art “translates” more successfully using an original print medium such as lithography, etching, serigraphy, or woodcuts. Some original prints have sold for more than $100,000 when done by prominent artists. The only time an art professional might utter “It’s just a print” is when they are referencing a reproductive print. This is usually a photographic rendition of an existing artwork, in other words, a photomechanical copy.

Why can’t you value my art from photographs?

• Liability
• As long as I am a professional art appraiser, I am held to a different standard than someone functioning strictly as a dealer.
• PLUS I like to be right!!!

Photographs do NOT reveal all condition issues and the public is not trained to properly describe them. How many of you can recognize light staining, mat burning, foxing, etc? These and other condition flaws significantly impact value.

• A reproduction attached to canvas virtually looks the same as an original oil painting in a photograph. Unless I know which museum is currently hosting the actual painting, I cannot be perfectly sure you are showing me a photographically generated reproduction or an actual painting when viewing a photograph. Now there are gicleé prints printed on canvas and enhanced with paint, a hands-on inspection is a must.

Airbrush Art Magazines

Airbrush Art Magazines

Almost all forms of art has a publications aimed at that particular art. Airbrush art is no different. There are a diversity of magazine publications to appeal to airbrush artists out there. Some magazines are in print and with the access of the internet there are airbrush art magazine online as well. Whether you are reading and learning more about airbrushing in a printed magazine or an online magazine you are sure to gain knowledge of the airbrush art industry. Airbrush art can be seen in magazines that are designed to teach techniques geared toward airbrushing in a more broad-spectrum. Airbrush art can also be seen in magazines geared toward airbrushing cars or bikes and such. Making for much more precise content toward a more specific niche.

Airbrush Technique Magazine is a broad spectrum magazine that is geared to teach techniques of airbrush art no matter what you are airbrushing. The publication is subscription based and can be obtain with a one year or a two year subscription. This is a good one if you are just wanting to gain more knowledge on airbrushing techniques whether you airbrush as a hobby or you do it professionally. The wide array of surfaces that Airbrush Technique Magazine covers includes but not limited to t-shirts ,canvas, the body, autos, motorcycles and so much more.

Airbrush Artist Magazine is a broad spectrum online membership based magazine. The online magazine offers articles, tutorials and videos to help you learn more about airbrush art. The magazine offers unlimited access to all of this with your membership to their online magazine. Airbrush Artists Magazine is updated once a month and aims to offer a minimum of two new lessons, tutorials and articles each month.

Art Scene International formerly known as Airbrush Art + Action magazine is a European based airbrush art magazine. The magazine is now being distributed in North America. While it has gained a large digital imaging interest the magazine is still a great asset to any airbrush artist. The magazine has full color images and is full of artist stories and how to articles that will help any airbrush artist.

Air Brush Action magazine is a publication on airbrush art that seems to have specific main niche for each publication. While each issue may include some other forms of airbrush art, the issue has a main theme throughout. The publication has buyer’s guides, tips and tricks, artist bios and so much more that is sure to be appreciated by any airbrush artist. By offering a major theme each month there is more chance of appealing to a wide array of readers.

If you are into automotive airbrushing then by grabbing one of their automotive issues you are guaranteed to get an issue that really goes all out on automotives instead of just a few mentions in the magazine on that particular niche of airbrush art. So keep tabs each month on their publications to see if they are covering your style of airbrush art.

Art Auctions For Sculptures

Art Auctions For Sculptures

Art auctions for sculptures are a great way to find new art for your home or office. I like to peruse the online auction sites for nice sculptures. I have found some very interesting items when I’ve looked.

There was a sculpture sold on eBay recently that was entitled Love. The art auction for this sculpture went above the estimated value. The piece was red and blue and made of polychrome aluminum. The French artist’s name was Robert Indiana. The art auction listed the item as six feet tall, six feet wide and three feet deep.

I liked a hall stand that was carved from wood that I found in an online art auction. The carving depicted a playful bear climbing a fir tree. There was a young bear cub carved into one of the branches. The branches were there to serve as garment hooks and there was even a mirror on the piece in a carved oak leaf designed frame.

There was an exquisite sculpture by a Russian artist that was sold recently in an art auction. The subject of the sculpture was a Bar Mitzvah boy and the medium was marble. I think that marble statues seem so timeless and elegant. It is an excellent medium for a sculpture.

The wife of artist Yitzhak Danziger signed a certificate for the brass sculpture her husband completed in 1969. Danziger is an Israeli artist. The piece looked very abstract to me. It did not do very well in the art auction and sold for less than it’s estimated worth.

I found a lot of bronze sculptures in the online art auctions. Most of them were of people, but the ones I liked best were abstract. My absolute favorite was a Harry Bertoia bronze sculpture called Bush. This piece is also known as a Brain or Coral. The bidding for this piece of art in the art auction was started at thirty nine thousand dollars. It didn’t get a bidder.

I saw little interest in the bronze sculpture art auctions for animal figures. I’m not sure if the reasons they didn’t get bidders were because of subject matter or because of price. Bronze is an expensive medium for an artist to work in and it takes a lot of training to be proficient.

I have a favorite glass sculptor. His work goes for so much in online art auctions that I will probably never own a piece of his work. Dale Chihuly is magnificent. There are permanent installations of his tremendous work all over the world.

Crystal sculptures look more like paperweights to me. Online art auctions for glass representations of animals and sea life are really neat. My favorite art auction recently was for a hand blown glass jellyfish. It was magical.

I liked another online art auction for optical crystal that had been turned into a work of art by artist Christopher Ries. The piece was small and called Lotus. It would look so pretty in a well lit display case.

I’m jealous of the buyer that gets to call this sculpture their own. They won the piece in the art auction for just under a thousand dollars. This artist uses blocks of pure, clear lead crystal cast from Schott Glass Technologies of Duryea, Pennsylvania. It is truly amazing art. His work is prominently displayed in numerous galleries and even in the Columbus airport in Columbus, Ohio.

Why You Should Learn Micro Airbrush Art

Why You Should Learn Micro Airbrush Art

Micro Airbrushing is a valuable skill for all airbrush artists. Being able to do micro airbrushing will allow for the artist to create a more realistic and more in depth detail on all small areas of their airbrush design. It is in these small areas that a lot of artist miss the chance to really define the details because they are unable to fully create the detailed area. Micro airbrushing is needed to really capture the details of these small areas. Micro airbrushing is also a valuable skill for an airbrush artist if they airbrush small model cars. By acquiring the skills needed to do micro airbrushing the artist can capture more detail in their airbrush art on the model car.

Imagine being able to create realistic eyes on a dragon you just airbrushed onto the hood of a small model car? When a person looks strongly at your artwork on the hood of the model car they can really see the capacity of the skills that you have as an airbrush artist. Or imagine that no matter what size your project is, even the fine details are brought out to the point that they demand to be noticed. All this can be done if an artist takes the time to learn micro airbrushing. There are couple of ways that an artist can learn how to do micro airbrush art.

One way that an artist can learn how to do micro airbrush art is to obtain a video created just to teach micro airbrushing. AirBrush Action has a video titled Micro Airbrushing that features airbrush artist Robert Benedict. With this video you will be shown how to airbrush 23 skulls onto an area the size of a dime. This video will show you every thing that you would every need to know about working with micro airbrushing. A couple of great features of the video is that you will learn how to truly work with House of Kolors paints and how to work with low air pressures. Learn more about how to do freehand is also a great asset of this video. These are advanced techniques and will take you as an artist to the next level of airbrush art.

Another way an artist can learn micro airbrushing is to work directly with an expert. Take on a workshop that teaches micro airbrushing and you can learn with some hands on projects under the supervision of an expert. Working with an expert can also mean signing up for some private one on one lessons that will give you more direct attention from the instructor. This could give you a little bit more of an edge over taking a work shop where the instructor has many people to teach at one time.

Once you have mastered your skills in micro airbrush art you will be amazed at the amount of detail that you can place in any airbrushing project. This ability will help set you apart from the rest of the competition and allow you to reach the top of the airbrush art industry. Becoming a truly renowned artist in your trade is dependent upon just how much detail you can capture in your work compared to other artists.

Basics Of Buying Art: Whether You’re A Pro Or Not

Basics Of Buying Art: Whether You’re A Pro Or Not

Buying and collecting art intelligently can be done by
anyone. That’s right, anyone. You do not need to have
experience in collecting art, previous knowledge about
the art business, or even a degree in art history. The
truth is, all you’ll need is love for and appreciation
of fine art; plus a yearning to collect; lastly,
willingness to learn a some simple techniques that
would help you evaluate any kind of art work coming
from any period of history, whomever the artist is and
whatever his or her nationality is.

Anything Goes

Although you might read some specific suggestions and
recommendations describing specific works of art, you
should take note that there is really no right or
wrong kind of art and that there’s no right or wrong
method to collect or buy art.

Everyone has the freedom to collect whatever it is
that they feel like collecting and buy whatever pieces
they feel like buying. It doesn’t really matter
whenever and wherever you feel like purchasing art,
for whatever reason, and for how much you feel like
spending on the purchase. As a result, the following
tips are not for everyone, but are typically designed
for those who want to spend their money wisely on
worth it pieces.

If you happen to be one of those people, then here are
some tips on how you can be a better art collector.

Four Way Questions On Buying Art

If the time comes that you see a piece that you want,
whether it be a painting, sculpture or a print, there
are generally four questions that you should ask
yourself to start your decision making.

Who’s The Artist?

To answer this, you have 2 reliable sources: spoken
and written information. Spoken info usually comes
from the artist himself, gallery exhibiting the piece
or the dealer. It can also com from other collectors,
friends, family, and other people that are familiar
about the art or the artist being considered. On the
other hand, written info could come in a number of
forms like artist career resumes, gallery exhibit
catalogues, art reference books and exhibition
reviews. How Important Is It?

This could be answered by simply looking at as many
possible pieces done by the artist. Try to be familiar
with the range of the artists’ art and see where that
particular piece falls. You can start by asking the
seller to show you a number of pieces done by the
artist, whether original, in print, or in photographs.
Also try to see works from all periods of the artist’s
career; doing this can teach you a lot about the
artwork and the artist at hand.

Where Has It Been?

Third, it’s also important to know where that
particular piece of art has been. This is done by
accumulating all incidental information about the
piece. It’s similar to making a biography of the
piece, from its birth, which is the artists’
completion of it, up until the present day.

This can be helpful since good provenance and
documentation can increase an artwork’s desirability,
collectability, and market value. Having a good
provenance in the art world is analogous to having
good pedigree in the pet world. For example, if a
painting was exhibited at a notable and important art
show, then it is more collectible than a similar
painting that wasn’t; just the same with awards and
prizes.

Is The Price Fair?

For this question, it doesn’t really matter what the
piece’s value may be in the future, since nobody can
really answer that. What you should want to know is
whether the piece is fairly priced today or not. This
is a very important question, because just like other
services or goods, art can sometimes come overpriced.

Struggling artists have been coming up with new ways of getting their name out into the mainstream

Struggling artists have been coming up with new ways of getting their name out into the mainstream

Online art galleries are sprouting up all over the Internet. Many of these sites are created by the artists. Some online art galleries are a part of a community or talent pool. No matter which method an artist uses these resources are probably the most useful, convenient and productive tools for the modern artist.

The artist can create his own online art galleries by purchasing domain names. There are several sites that offer free web space but they often lack enough room to display the art adequately. You really want to use a source that offers a lot of options as well as a lot of space.

The great thing about these online art galleries is that they give the artists control over the presentations. When working as part of a talent pool or in a collective project, you may find that your own work might not gel with the rest of the online gallery. Creating an individual site is a great way to promote your work as a whole.

Maintaining the site and updating the art quickly becomes second nature. Online talent pools are also great because they help the artist promote his work. Even though these online art galleries do not showcase one single artist they do help in circulating the images.

Many talent pools require a percentage of the final cost of the project. Using online art galleries is a great way for an artist to apply for projects without carrying a portfolio or maintaining a one-man gallery that no one visits.

The talent pool online art galleries are also very useful for telecommuting jobs. The entire working relationship between artist and client can be handled over the Internet and by telephone.

The advances in art through computer generated images are astounding. The use of online art galleries for professional use is also incredible. Today’s artists have so many more opportunities to be exposed to a wide audience. Whether you want to find work or whether you just want to share your creations, online art galleries are the perfect vehicles for your craft.