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Art Degree in Graphic Design

Art Degree in Graphic Design

If you enjoy working with color and creating interesting designs, you may enjoy pursuing an art degree in graphic design. Graphic artists are always in demand and as the internet is now part of our daily lives, there are even more opportunities to prosper in the field of graphic design.

Those who are interested in obtaining an art degree in graphic design should like to work with color. In art school, you will learn all about how to use color as well as different software that is now available for graphic design artists. Someone who enjoys creating designs that are used in packaging and advertising will enjoy learning this art form.

An art degree in graphic design can be obtained either at art school or even at an online school. Graphic design is one of the few art degrees that are available online. If you are stuck in a job that you do not like, that does not make use of your creative talents and flair for color, you can attend online art school without having to leave home or leave your current position.

Once you have earned your degree as a graphic artist, you will most likely work for a corporation that designs packaging, posters or even websites. As is the case with any other position, your education will get you in the front door, but you will have to start out in an entry level position such as a designer or layout artist before becoming a noted graphic design artist. However, because the media world is ever expanding, there are plenty of employment opportunities for those qualified individuals with a degree in graphic arts. Even entry level positions can pay well and will give you creative fulfillment.

If you are the type of person who has always enjoyed creating logos or posters and working with design, an art degree in graphic art may be right up your alley. Even if you have aspirations of being a famous sketch artist or painter, such a degree can do wonders for a creative person as it can provide a way to make a good living while pursuing other creative endeavors.

People who enjoy careers in graphic design are often those who create video packaging, album covers, posters, product packaging, logo designs and more. An eye for color and detail is important but a person does not have to be a sketch artist to succeed as a graphic designer. As is the case with most creative careers, an active imagination and creative background are more important than drawing abilities.

For those who love working in the art world but do not want to struggle along painting or trying to eek a living out of sketching or drawing, a career in the world of graphic arts can be the ticket to the creative career they envision. If you are the type of person who enjoys working with color and has an active imagination and enjoys using the creative part of your brain, consider getting an art degree in graphic design from an accredited art college or online university.

Start an Art Collectible Hobby and Beautify Your Home

Start an Art Collectible Hobby and Beautify Your Home

Collecting is a fun hobby, and one of the most interesting things to collect are art collectibles. Many different items can be painted with artwork and become an art collectible. Hobby enthusiasts collect such things as saw blades, and wooden eggs which have had artwork painted on. People even collect designer rugs as art. Another art collectible hobby is collecting limited edition plates, thimbles, Christmas ornaments, and figurines produced by such companies as Bradford Exchange. And of course, many people collect fine art paintings.

The person with an art collectible hobby will probably find his or her own favorite artists whose works they appreciate. They can choose to focus on one particular artist, either past or present, or they can choose from the works of many artists. On the other hand, they may collect art and art objects around a theme they enjoy, such as cigars, wild animals, or piano music.

One may think of an art collector as a rich person who has the money to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on an original Van Gogh. A person of more modest means can collect art too, however. Post cards are a good place to start. Most art museum gift shops offer high quality, glossy postcards printed with some of their more notable acquisitions. By buying those cards one really appreciates, anyone can have an art collection.

Ebay is a good source of art collectibles whatever type of art or collectible you fancy. In fact, if you are just starting out, the choices and options can be overwhelming! Just remember that you can sell your own belongings as well as buying those of others. This should make the impact on the budget a little less powerful. Other ideas for inexpensively collecting art collectibles are scouring flea markets, thrift shops, and garage sales. You never know what treasure someone else may be getting rid of.

One nice thing about art collectibles is that artists can be found in every part of the world. The art collector should scout the local art shows, museums, and artist’s hangouts to find out just what sort of talent can be had less expensively and close to home. Because of the local flavor of some artwork, art collectibles make good travel souvenirs. For instance, the artist Linda Barnicott specializes in paintings of scenes, buildings, and landmarks found around Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Similarly, collectors can find local artist almost everywhere.

An art collectible hobby will keep you interested in life and give you a home filled with art masterpieces as well. If you enjoy pretty and interesting things around you, consider starting an art collectible hobby today.

Mixed Media Art Auctions

Mixed Media Art Auctions

Mixed media art auctions have a lot to offer. Today I found several seriolithographs. I liked the colors that the Polish artist Zamy Steynovitz used.

The fun part of mixed media art auctions is that you just never know what you’ll find. I found a pebble art piece from the 1960’s that featured a bare-chested chariot driver cracking a whip. The piece also had three horses. The medium of pebbles was very interesting.

Another interesting find while I was looking through mixed media art auctions was a mirrored wall hanging that represents the Manhattan skyline. This piece was made before the destruction of the World Trade Center buildings and they are represented in the piece.

Sometimes the medium used in mixed media art is the same as other categories of art. I found a nice acrylic painting in a mixed media art auction that was unusual because of its subject. The artist painted a red sea dragon with a lovely woman. I learned that the artist was influenced by Salvador Dali, HP Lovecraft and his love of the game Dungeons and Dragons.

I found a really pretty 3-D art collage shadowbox while I was looking through the mixed media art auctions. The title of the piece was True Confessions of a Mermaid Gone Bad. The piece was listed as professionally framed art with glass in yellow stained wood.

Mixed media art auctions bring so many different artistic styles to light. I found a Scandinavian inspired design of two peacocks on a hand stitched wall hanging. The piece was surrounded by a decorative border and the frame was reported to be in great condition.

Sometimes the mixed media art auctions include artistic things like hand made cards. I found an artist that lists auctions of greeting card collages. The ones that I was looking at used vintage images, ink and extremely decorative paper.

There was an item of art that came up in my searches of mixed media art auctions that I really liked. It was listed as a beautiful abstract tin art. It was actually quite impressive and was listed as measuring two feet by two and a half feet. I think this would actually look great on my mother-in-law’s wall.

So many of the paintings I found listed in the mixed media art auctions were just unusual versions of mainstream subjects. I have found so many art auctions with poppies painted on canvas, but today I found a white poppy painted in oil with a brilliant emerald green background. It was very striking and I think that the contemporary feel to this piece came across very well.

I had never considered vintage maps to be art before I found them in the mixed media art auctions. I guess when a map becomes antique and is no longer useful for its original intended purpose, it can become art. I found a listing for battle maps that was very intriguing. This map would look good framed and displayed with other war related memorabilia.

Mixed media art auctions really do have a lot of different kinds of art represented. I found an artist with items listed whose medium is purses. She makes purses from cigar boxes and solders a handle and various embellishments on the side. The purses are really quite delightful.

Is it Art – Instant drawing and the digital darkroom

Is it Art – Instant drawing and the digital darkroom

Henri Cartier-Bresson is reported to have said after he had given up photography.

“All I care about these days is painting—photography has never been more than a way into painting, a sort of instant drawing.”

No one disagrees that painting is art, albeit the quality may vary but it is always considered art. Why isn’t this the case with photography? It is agreed that there is an art to photography but this means it is a craft but photography of the highest order is referred to as “photographic art”. Likewise images created on or enhanced by a computer are labelled as “digital art” or “computer art”. Whereas painting is just art, be it water colour, oil or acrylic.

In part the problem lies with the artist. The discussion about photography is littered knee deep with technique and coloured with technical jargon. Seldom if ever is the art discussed. I have yet to find a discussion about a painter’s work where the types and sizes of the brushes scores a mention. And quite frankly who really cares? If I was to twiddle the knobs like Ansel Adams would I make an Adam’s photograph? The simple answer is no, I’m not Ansel Adams.

The photographer makes the photograph with their attitudes, opinions, experience and aesthetic. The very same attributes that the painter brings to their work, as does the sculptor, the writer or the composer. Technical ability only makes technically correct work. The most interesting work is that which is out there pushing the boundaries, ignoring the rules and making it up as they go along, finding new forms of expression.

The development of the digital darkroom heralds a new age for photography. Gone are the days of mechanical drawing, now full blown paintings are as accessible as the artist’s ability to imagine them. With attitude, opinion, experience and aesthetic being the guiding principles not the recipes of those who have gone before.

It is a play ground, don’t worry about mistakes it is through them that we learn. As one of the greatest artist’s of the 20th Century, Pablo Picasso, said, “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up”.

Misconceptions With Your Art’s Value

Misconceptions With Your Art’s Value

Knowing the value of art can require some skill and
experience. If you’re starting on a collection and do
not know how to value art, then lucky you, since you
can always get the help of an art appraiser. However,
if you decide on pursuing the value for yourself, then
be sure that you avoid making some of the common
mistakes regarding the matter.

Most people seeking the value of a piece tend to
simply look at the price list and from there on,
conclude the value of the work in consideration.
However, there is much to value than simple market
prices. Pricelists can be very misleading, since
artworks’ values are not only determined by its price;
here are some of the reasons why, and some other
overlooked factors when valuating an art.

It’s A Bargain!

Sometimes, if an auction is poorly publicized, they
hold sales or bargains in order to sell. Thus, you can
find great art that are priced way low from their real
value in this kind of auctions. There are also
instances in which only single bidders are able to
recognize the significance of the art at hand. During
this kind of situations, the piece can also be sold at
a low price if there are no other bidders who want to
pursue the piece. No Auction Records

There are instances too in which the significant works
of a certain artist have never been sold in any kind
of auction. It’s quite normal for the finest and
popular pieces by an artist to sell for huge amounts
of money, approximately tens of thousands or even
more, at galleries. However, that same artist can have
high auction records only in level of low or
mid-thousands of bucks. Thus, if your artist has not
had any significant work of his through any auction,
then you can also value the work extremely low.

Great Continuums

It can also be hard for you to value the piece if the
price range of the artist is too great. For example,
an artist can have hundreds or even thousands of
auction records, ranging for instance in between
$1000-$200,000. If you are not a competent
professional appraiser, for sure you’ll probable have
little or even no idea where the piece would fit in
with a continuum that is vast as that.

Significance Is The Key For an artwork to be
accurately valued, its significance should be
determined. Thus, you should get to know how the piece
would level in respect to how excellent, well, or bad
it is done, compared to the other works of the same
artist. Techniques used in the piece and its overall
aesthetics play a role here. So, if your piece at hand
is really good, yet you’re not able to know or see how
good it is, then for sure you’re going to value it way
low from its justified value.

Unearthing History Matters

Additionally, historical significance would also
matter in valuing your art. The more it is
historically significant, the higher its value is.
Factors like the piece being able to transcend its
artist due to what it represents, when it was created,
where it was done, and other similar mitigating
aspects, play a role with its history significance.
Thus, if you haven’t uncovered the historical
significance of your art, then it would probably have
a low value for you.

Art Auctions on eBay

Art Auctions on eBay

I’ve been looking at art auctions on eBay all day today. I have found some wonderful things. I browsed the Art category and chose the subcategory of self-representing artists.

I like what I see for sale. Art auctions on eBay are a great way for an unknown or even a known artist to sell their paintings. I found some nice paintings in the featured section.

Since I was looking at art auctions on eBay, I used the option to just view the picture gallery. I’m glad I did that because I really just wanted to see the art, not the title of the auction. What immediately caught my eye was all of the bold colors.

On the first page of image results of art auctions on eBay, there was a beautiful painting of a martini. I think that martini images seem very classy to me. I can visualize this painting in the home of someone with a glass coffee table and a leather couch!

The virtual foot traffic that art auctions on eBay gets is incredible. The artist can get so much more exposure to so many more people than hanging their paintings in galleries. It is just such a good way to get discovered.

I did think it was a little funny when I saw art auctions on eBay listed for 99 million dollars. The artist wants to make history by breaking the world record for the most paid for a painting by a living artist. The record is currently forty million dollars.

There was another art auction on eBay that really caught my eye. The artist was Kelly Shanks and she lives in Boston. The painting that I saw was done in an impressionist style and called Neon Rain. It is part of her New Orleans series. I liked it a lot.

I found an art auction on eBay for a painting entitled The Egg Eaters. It was really odd and didn’t exactly suit me. I tried to imagine where it would end up hanging. I think that fantasy art just can’t hang everywhere. I can see this hanging in an upscale gaming store or in a bachelor pad.

The funniest art auction I saw on eBay was for a folk art rendition of a Jack Russell terrier. I can only imagine that a dog lover should own and display this. The dog looks like he is about to jump up on me!

I found a landscape that I really liked when I was looking through the art auctions on eBay. The piece was called Red Barn under Praire Clouds. I think that if this was hanging in my bedroom, I might never get out of bed. I love to watch clouds.

I guess I just don’t understand abstract art. I think if I understood it, I could appreciate it. I found an art auction on eBay for an original painting called Beige Dancelines #2. The artist says that it is an abstract dancing figure. I just can’t see anything but an oversized ear.

There were so many photos to look at when I was searching on eBay for art auctions. I think that my tastes really run to realism and landscapes. I especially liked a painting of Alaska by Hunter Jay. The blues in the picture were really nice; I’ll bet that this painting is wonderful in person.

My mother-in-law has been decorating her house slowly. I found a really nice art auction on eBay for her that would fit her likes. The painting depicts a tree at sunset and is just beautiful. The artist has a lot of auctions and I really hope that she sells a lot. She is very talented.

The only other art auction on eBay that I spent a lot of time looking at was a painting of red tulips against a yellow sky. I’m not sure why I was so taken by this painting. Tulips are my favorite flower. The tulips in this painting are just suspended in the center. They just seem to hang there magically. I really liked this depiction of my favorite flower.

Art Prints—Finding The Best Value

Art Prints—Finding The Best Value

You’re not in college anymore, and it’s time to take down the posters and replace them with original art. But, you don’t have the money yet for oils or watercolors. Art prints are an affordable alternative, yet they too can be pricey. How can you tell if that art print that’s caught your eye is more than just another pretty face?

Art prints are works of art in and of themselves, and may be handmade by artist-printmakers (artists’ prints), digitally printed (giclée), or photomechanical reproductions (offset lithographs).

Artists’ prints are handmade and are not reproductions of paintings: the print is a unique work of art. The term covers a range of printmaking techniques such as etching, woodcut, engraving, screenprint and linocut. Editions tend to be less than 200, partly because the materials used to make the prints wear out. This type of print is sometimes called an “original print.”

Limited edition reproductions are multiples copies of the same image, but produced in guaranteed limited numbers. This makes the image more exclusive. The market price can rise over time, if demand outstrips supply. Edition sizes vary but are limited by market forces, not by the physical constraints of the printmaking method. Most limited editions are signed and numbered in pencil by the artist with a commitment that no other reproduction of the image will be made.

An open-edition reproduction print can be produced in any quantity and the image may also be used in other ways, such as on tableware. Open editions tend to cost less than limited editions and are much less likely to increase in value.

Giclée prints are made using digital printing technology, usually inkjet. The technology enables users to produce small runs of prints. It also allows retailers to offer ‘print on demand’ services, where buyers select an image and it is printed out there and then.

Several factors influence the price of art prints:

Artist and Rarity
Certainly the name of the artist is a major contributor to value. But the art prints of even the same artist may have widely ranging prices. This added value is due to rarity. The more valuable print may be part of a limited edition run of only a few copies, while the more affordable from a larger open-edition run. But they are both original pieces of art by the same artist. It’s a good idea to be well acquainted with the works of a particular artist and his or her peers as well. Research into an artist’s place in the art world will help you ensure you’re getting a good value.

Editions, Signatures and Seals
Before the twentieth century artists did not routinely number nor sign their prints by hand. A signature can come from the plate but is not much of a value. What counts is an individual signature of the artist on the print, usually with a pencil (ink would eventually fade). Modern art prints are often numbered by the artist himself, i.e., “34 / 100” (number 34 out of an edition of 100).

Condition
It’s not unusual for older art prints to have some flaws. If there aren’t any, check again! It might be a reproduction. While minor flaws such as slight soiling are considered normal, depending on age, other defects, such as trimming into the image or heavily faded colors, can reduce the value of a print considerably.

Quality of Impression
Prints taken early from a plate or woodblock are more precise and detailed in lines than later impressions. Depending on the technique, a block/plate is worn out after a certain amount of impressions. Hardly more than 2,000 impressions could be taken from a woodblock without a rather visible deterioration of quality. Look to the numbering (i.e., 15 / 450) to determine what place in the run the print had.

Size
Larger prints tend to cost more than smaller ones. This rule of thumb is less valid for older prints than for modern ones.

Provenance
Provenance, or the item’s ownership history, can influence value. Prints from a famous collection will usually yield a premium.

Subject
Although a matter of opinion and personal taste, the subject of a print has a great influence on value. You’ll pay more for cute animals, pretty women, nice landscapes, interesting portraits. Commercially non-appealing subjects are ugly, gloomy, or war-related, no matter how classically significant the work is. After all, it’s being bought to put on the wall. People will pay more if they like the image.

In the end, it’s your own opinion of the value of the print that matters the most. You’ll be happiest with an art print that you personally like. Although art prints can sometimes be a good investment, the best way to get the most for your money is to enjoy it every day as it graces your home. The value of that? Priceless.

Supplies Used For Creating Art

Supplies Used For Creating Art

Many artists will display their artistic abilities at an early age. These are children that often use walls as a canvas and might choose to use various shades of color that could come from a variety of pencils, pens and crayons that they find at eye-level throughout the home. The art that they create might not be purchased by a local art gallery but it may be photographed and placed in a family album.

Some artists will choose to buy their art supplies from a local craft store. These stores tend to have a larger selection of paints because the paints can be used on a variety of projects that are for sale in the store. The selection of paints might be offered in tubes that can dispense paint onto boards where they can be combined with other colors as the artist paints a variety of images on a variety of materials.

The mediums used to display art can be canvas that is framed and offered in various sizes, or a sketch pad that is specially formulated to allow lead to adhere to the surface or be smudged a bit when the artist wants to show a bit more detail in the art that they are creating. The artists will be supplied with many types of lead to create silhouette paintings or landscapes that are roughly finished.

Many artists treat all of their supplies in a haphazard manner. Many friends might relate this treatment of the supplies as a form of creative expression. The artist always seems to know where to find the supplies that they need to accomplish any form of artwork that they are hired to make. A creative artist may have learned to improvise on supplies at times because they have not had a paying customer in a while.

Some artists prefer to sketch images out in rough draft before they apply those images to canvas. Canvas paintings are usually very expensive and artists will usually reserve their best paints to achieve a beautiful painting in the end. These pieces of art will usually be placed in real wood frames and later sealed on the back to project a professionally finished project that is ready for hanging anywhere.

An artist will keep a ready supply of all of the instruments that they use on a day to day basis including tools for sculpting and those tools and special pens that are used to write calligraphy. Every artist will always maintain an arsenal of brushes that they will use to apply a varied amount of colored paints to many surfaces. Some of those brushes will be synthetic and the better brushes will be made from horsehair.

Every artist will keep their best paintings in a portfolio that will be used to present art to customers. These protective folders are quite large in size and the artist can always be sure that the paintings remain safe inside when they tie the strings of the portfolio together and use it as a handy strap to carry the portfolio from one location to another. An artist will place a lot of value into the supplies they own because these supplies are the method that allows them to be creative.

Art Myths Debunked

Art Myths Debunked

Assumption: Art becomes more valuable once an artist dies.

Actuality: Prices escalate only when demand is greater than supply. Prices can increase if there was a shortage of the artist’s work prior to his or her death and if the demand continues to be significantly greater than supply. Art News (November 2003) presented an article on the ten most wanted artworks. These would sell individually for more than $5 Million IF the present owners would let me them go. However, as the collectors know they could not acquire a replacement painting/sculpture/drawing, they won’t be selling these artworks.

Assumption: An artist’s proof is more valuable than a print from the regular edition.

Actuality: Artist’s proofs are routinely consistent with the regular edition in appearance and value. On rare occasions, a color trial proof be judged to be more valuable than the regular edition or an artist’s proof. this happens when the reigning experts determine the color trial proof represents a more handsome product than the regular edition or artist’s proof.

Assumption: It’s just a print.

Actuality: Some artist’s do or do not choose to paint. Their art “translates” more successfully using an original print medium such as lithography, etching, serigraphy, or woodcuts. Some original prints have sold for more than $100,000 when done by prominent artists. The only time an art professional might utter “It’s just a print” is when they are referencing a reproductive print. This is usually a photographic rendition of an existing artwork, in other words, a photomechanical copy.

Why can’t you value my art from photographs?

• Liability
• As long as I am a professional art appraiser, I am held to a different standard than someone functioning strictly as a dealer.
• PLUS I like to be right!!!

Photographs do NOT reveal all condition issues and the public is not trained to properly describe them. How many of you can recognize light staining, mat burning, foxing, etc? These and other condition flaws significantly impact value.

• A reproduction attached to canvas virtually looks the same as an original oil painting in a photograph. Unless I know which museum is currently hosting the actual painting, I cannot be perfectly sure you are showing me a photographically generated reproduction or an actual painting when viewing a photograph. Now there are gicleé prints printed on canvas and enhanced with paint, a hands-on inspection is a must.

Airbrush Art Magazines

Airbrush Art Magazines

Almost all forms of art has a publications aimed at that particular art. Airbrush art is no different. There are a diversity of magazine publications to appeal to airbrush artists out there. Some magazines are in print and with the access of the internet there are airbrush art magazine online as well. Whether you are reading and learning more about airbrushing in a printed magazine or an online magazine you are sure to gain knowledge of the airbrush art industry. Airbrush art can be seen in magazines that are designed to teach techniques geared toward airbrushing in a more broad-spectrum. Airbrush art can also be seen in magazines geared toward airbrushing cars or bikes and such. Making for much more precise content toward a more specific niche.

Airbrush Technique Magazine is a broad spectrum magazine that is geared to teach techniques of airbrush art no matter what you are airbrushing. The publication is subscription based and can be obtain with a one year or a two year subscription. This is a good one if you are just wanting to gain more knowledge on airbrushing techniques whether you airbrush as a hobby or you do it professionally. The wide array of surfaces that Airbrush Technique Magazine covers includes but not limited to t-shirts ,canvas, the body, autos, motorcycles and so much more.

Airbrush Artist Magazine is a broad spectrum online membership based magazine. The online magazine offers articles, tutorials and videos to help you learn more about airbrush art. The magazine offers unlimited access to all of this with your membership to their online magazine. Airbrush Artists Magazine is updated once a month and aims to offer a minimum of two new lessons, tutorials and articles each month.

Art Scene International formerly known as Airbrush Art + Action magazine is a European based airbrush art magazine. The magazine is now being distributed in North America. While it has gained a large digital imaging interest the magazine is still a great asset to any airbrush artist. The magazine has full color images and is full of artist stories and how to articles that will help any airbrush artist.

Air Brush Action magazine is a publication on airbrush art that seems to have specific main niche for each publication. While each issue may include some other forms of airbrush art, the issue has a main theme throughout. The publication has buyer’s guides, tips and tricks, artist bios and so much more that is sure to be appreciated by any airbrush artist. By offering a major theme each month there is more chance of appealing to a wide array of readers.

If you are into automotive airbrushing then by grabbing one of their automotive issues you are guaranteed to get an issue that really goes all out on automotives instead of just a few mentions in the magazine on that particular niche of airbrush art. So keep tabs each month on their publications to see if they are covering your style of airbrush art.