Tag Archives: art

Airbrush Art Magazines

Airbrush Art Magazines

Almost all forms of art has a publications aimed at that particular art. Airbrush art is no different. There are a diversity of magazine publications to appeal to airbrush artists out there. Some magazines are in print and with the access of the internet there are airbrush art magazine online as well. Whether you are reading and learning more about airbrushing in a printed magazine or an online magazine you are sure to gain knowledge of the airbrush art industry. Airbrush art can be seen in magazines that are designed to teach techniques geared toward airbrushing in a more broad-spectrum. Airbrush art can also be seen in magazines geared toward airbrushing cars or bikes and such. Making for much more precise content toward a more specific niche.

Airbrush Technique Magazine is a broad spectrum magazine that is geared to teach techniques of airbrush art no matter what you are airbrushing. The publication is subscription based and can be obtain with a one year or a two year subscription. This is a good one if you are just wanting to gain more knowledge on airbrushing techniques whether you airbrush as a hobby or you do it professionally. The wide array of surfaces that Airbrush Technique Magazine covers includes but not limited to t-shirts ,canvas, the body, autos, motorcycles and so much more.

Airbrush Artist Magazine is a broad spectrum online membership based magazine. The online magazine offers articles, tutorials and videos to help you learn more about airbrush art. The magazine offers unlimited access to all of this with your membership to their online magazine. Airbrush Artists Magazine is updated once a month and aims to offer a minimum of two new lessons, tutorials and articles each month.

Art Scene International formerly known as Airbrush Art + Action magazine is a European based airbrush art magazine. The magazine is now being distributed in North America. While it has gained a large digital imaging interest the magazine is still a great asset to any airbrush artist. The magazine has full color images and is full of artist stories and how to articles that will help any airbrush artist.

Air Brush Action magazine is a publication on airbrush art that seems to have specific main niche for each publication. While each issue may include some other forms of airbrush art, the issue has a main theme throughout. The publication has buyer’s guides, tips and tricks, artist bios and so much more that is sure to be appreciated by any airbrush artist. By offering a major theme each month there is more chance of appealing to a wide array of readers.

If you are into automotive airbrushing then by grabbing one of their automotive issues you are guaranteed to get an issue that really goes all out on automotives instead of just a few mentions in the magazine on that particular niche of airbrush art. So keep tabs each month on their publications to see if they are covering your style of airbrush art.

Art Auctions For Sculptures

Art Auctions For Sculptures

Art auctions for sculptures are a great way to find new art for your home or office. I like to peruse the online auction sites for nice sculptures. I have found some very interesting items when I’ve looked.

There was a sculpture sold on eBay recently that was entitled Love. The art auction for this sculpture went above the estimated value. The piece was red and blue and made of polychrome aluminum. The French artist’s name was Robert Indiana. The art auction listed the item as six feet tall, six feet wide and three feet deep.

I liked a hall stand that was carved from wood that I found in an online art auction. The carving depicted a playful bear climbing a fir tree. There was a young bear cub carved into one of the branches. The branches were there to serve as garment hooks and there was even a mirror on the piece in a carved oak leaf designed frame.

There was an exquisite sculpture by a Russian artist that was sold recently in an art auction. The subject of the sculpture was a Bar Mitzvah boy and the medium was marble. I think that marble statues seem so timeless and elegant. It is an excellent medium for a sculpture.

The wife of artist Yitzhak Danziger signed a certificate for the brass sculpture her husband completed in 1969. Danziger is an Israeli artist. The piece looked very abstract to me. It did not do very well in the art auction and sold for less than it’s estimated worth.

I found a lot of bronze sculptures in the online art auctions. Most of them were of people, but the ones I liked best were abstract. My absolute favorite was a Harry Bertoia bronze sculpture called Bush. This piece is also known as a Brain or Coral. The bidding for this piece of art in the art auction was started at thirty nine thousand dollars. It didn’t get a bidder.

I saw little interest in the bronze sculpture art auctions for animal figures. I’m not sure if the reasons they didn’t get bidders were because of subject matter or because of price. Bronze is an expensive medium for an artist to work in and it takes a lot of training to be proficient.

I have a favorite glass sculptor. His work goes for so much in online art auctions that I will probably never own a piece of his work. Dale Chihuly is magnificent. There are permanent installations of his tremendous work all over the world.

Crystal sculptures look more like paperweights to me. Online art auctions for glass representations of animals and sea life are really neat. My favorite art auction recently was for a hand blown glass jellyfish. It was magical.

I liked another online art auction for optical crystal that had been turned into a work of art by artist Christopher Ries. The piece was small and called Lotus. It would look so pretty in a well lit display case.

I’m jealous of the buyer that gets to call this sculpture their own. They won the piece in the art auction for just under a thousand dollars. This artist uses blocks of pure, clear lead crystal cast from Schott Glass Technologies of Duryea, Pennsylvania. It is truly amazing art. His work is prominently displayed in numerous galleries and even in the Columbus airport in Columbus, Ohio.

Why You Should Learn Micro Airbrush Art

Why You Should Learn Micro Airbrush Art

Micro Airbrushing is a valuable skill for all airbrush artists. Being able to do micro airbrushing will allow for the artist to create a more realistic and more in depth detail on all small areas of their airbrush design. It is in these small areas that a lot of artist miss the chance to really define the details because they are unable to fully create the detailed area. Micro airbrushing is needed to really capture the details of these small areas. Micro airbrushing is also a valuable skill for an airbrush artist if they airbrush small model cars. By acquiring the skills needed to do micro airbrushing the artist can capture more detail in their airbrush art on the model car.

Imagine being able to create realistic eyes on a dragon you just airbrushed onto the hood of a small model car? When a person looks strongly at your artwork on the hood of the model car they can really see the capacity of the skills that you have as an airbrush artist. Or imagine that no matter what size your project is, even the fine details are brought out to the point that they demand to be noticed. All this can be done if an artist takes the time to learn micro airbrushing. There are couple of ways that an artist can learn how to do micro airbrush art.

One way that an artist can learn how to do micro airbrush art is to obtain a video created just to teach micro airbrushing. AirBrush Action has a video titled Micro Airbrushing that features airbrush artist Robert Benedict. With this video you will be shown how to airbrush 23 skulls onto an area the size of a dime. This video will show you every thing that you would every need to know about working with micro airbrushing. A couple of great features of the video is that you will learn how to truly work with House of Kolors paints and how to work with low air pressures. Learn more about how to do freehand is also a great asset of this video. These are advanced techniques and will take you as an artist to the next level of airbrush art.

Another way an artist can learn micro airbrushing is to work directly with an expert. Take on a workshop that teaches micro airbrushing and you can learn with some hands on projects under the supervision of an expert. Working with an expert can also mean signing up for some private one on one lessons that will give you more direct attention from the instructor. This could give you a little bit more of an edge over taking a work shop where the instructor has many people to teach at one time.

Once you have mastered your skills in micro airbrush art you will be amazed at the amount of detail that you can place in any airbrushing project. This ability will help set you apart from the rest of the competition and allow you to reach the top of the airbrush art industry. Becoming a truly renowned artist in your trade is dependent upon just how much detail you can capture in your work compared to other artists.

Basics Of Buying Art: Whether You’re A Pro Or Not

Basics Of Buying Art: Whether You’re A Pro Or Not

Buying and collecting art intelligently can be done by
anyone. That’s right, anyone. You do not need to have
experience in collecting art, previous knowledge about
the art business, or even a degree in art history. The
truth is, all you’ll need is love for and appreciation
of fine art; plus a yearning to collect; lastly,
willingness to learn a some simple techniques that
would help you evaluate any kind of art work coming
from any period of history, whomever the artist is and
whatever his or her nationality is.

Anything Goes

Although you might read some specific suggestions and
recommendations describing specific works of art, you
should take note that there is really no right or
wrong kind of art and that there’s no right or wrong
method to collect or buy art.

Everyone has the freedom to collect whatever it is
that they feel like collecting and buy whatever pieces
they feel like buying. It doesn’t really matter
whenever and wherever you feel like purchasing art,
for whatever reason, and for how much you feel like
spending on the purchase. As a result, the following
tips are not for everyone, but are typically designed
for those who want to spend their money wisely on
worth it pieces.

If you happen to be one of those people, then here are
some tips on how you can be a better art collector.

Four Way Questions On Buying Art

If the time comes that you see a piece that you want,
whether it be a painting, sculpture or a print, there
are generally four questions that you should ask
yourself to start your decision making.

Who’s The Artist?

To answer this, you have 2 reliable sources: spoken
and written information. Spoken info usually comes
from the artist himself, gallery exhibiting the piece
or the dealer. It can also com from other collectors,
friends, family, and other people that are familiar
about the art or the artist being considered. On the
other hand, written info could come in a number of
forms like artist career resumes, gallery exhibit
catalogues, art reference books and exhibition
reviews. How Important Is It?

This could be answered by simply looking at as many
possible pieces done by the artist. Try to be familiar
with the range of the artists’ art and see where that
particular piece falls. You can start by asking the
seller to show you a number of pieces done by the
artist, whether original, in print, or in photographs.
Also try to see works from all periods of the artist’s
career; doing this can teach you a lot about the
artwork and the artist at hand.

Where Has It Been?

Third, it’s also important to know where that
particular piece of art has been. This is done by
accumulating all incidental information about the
piece. It’s similar to making a biography of the
piece, from its birth, which is the artists’
completion of it, up until the present day.

This can be helpful since good provenance and
documentation can increase an artwork’s desirability,
collectability, and market value. Having a good
provenance in the art world is analogous to having
good pedigree in the pet world. For example, if a
painting was exhibited at a notable and important art
show, then it is more collectible than a similar
painting that wasn’t; just the same with awards and
prizes.

Is The Price Fair?

For this question, it doesn’t really matter what the
piece’s value may be in the future, since nobody can
really answer that. What you should want to know is
whether the piece is fairly priced today or not. This
is a very important question, because just like other
services or goods, art can sometimes come overpriced.

Struggling artists have been coming up with new ways of getting their name out into the mainstream

Struggling artists have been coming up with new ways of getting their name out into the mainstream

Online art galleries are sprouting up all over the Internet. Many of these sites are created by the artists. Some online art galleries are a part of a community or talent pool. No matter which method an artist uses these resources are probably the most useful, convenient and productive tools for the modern artist.

The artist can create his own online art galleries by purchasing domain names. There are several sites that offer free web space but they often lack enough room to display the art adequately. You really want to use a source that offers a lot of options as well as a lot of space.

The great thing about these online art galleries is that they give the artists control over the presentations. When working as part of a talent pool or in a collective project, you may find that your own work might not gel with the rest of the online gallery. Creating an individual site is a great way to promote your work as a whole.

Maintaining the site and updating the art quickly becomes second nature. Online talent pools are also great because they help the artist promote his work. Even though these online art galleries do not showcase one single artist they do help in circulating the images.

Many talent pools require a percentage of the final cost of the project. Using online art galleries is a great way for an artist to apply for projects without carrying a portfolio or maintaining a one-man gallery that no one visits.

The talent pool online art galleries are also very useful for telecommuting jobs. The entire working relationship between artist and client can be handled over the Internet and by telephone.

The advances in art through computer generated images are astounding. The use of online art galleries for professional use is also incredible. Today’s artists have so many more opportunities to be exposed to a wide audience. Whether you want to find work or whether you just want to share your creations, online art galleries are the perfect vehicles for your craft.

Ten Tips for Buying Art – and Getting the Best Bang for Your Buck!

Ten Tips for Buying Art – and Getting the Best Bang for Your Buck!

Investing in art can be rewarding on a personal and financial level. The following tips will ensure you get the best of both worlds!
1. Get online. Like everything else, comparison-shopping will ensure you find the best product for your situation. The Internet is the only efficient way to take advantage of the vast array of different styles, prices, mediums and sizes of art available to collectors.
2. Avoid art without a price. When you are directed to inquire about pricing, it is most likely an attempt to gauge your interest and charge you the highest possible price according to your circumstances.
3. Look for an independent artist. Commercial galleries have their place, but you get far better value when you purchase directly from an emerging or “not-yet-established” artist. Keep in mind, as well, that a gallery’s cut is usually 50% of what you pay.
4. Find a unique, consistent style. A contemporary work of art that looks “just like” a Monet or Picasso, for example, might have aesthetic appeal, but will not prove to be “valuable” over time. Ultimately, you want to find an artist who can eventually be identified by his or her style (without looking at the signature).
5. Study the artist’s biography. Knowing some fundamental information about an artist can help you gauge their potential for growth and often provides insight into their work.
6. Look for dedication, not education. When looking for a great doctor or lawyer, academic accreditation matters. When looking for great art, however, it really doesn’t matter at all. Artists whose work appreciates the fastest exhibit a strong work ethic and a lifelong dedication to their craft. Picasso, for example, had no formal training past the age of 16, but was the most prolific artist of the 20th century.
7. Interact directly with the artist before buying. Like hiring a good employee, the best way to “prospect” a particular artist is to speak with them. When buying art online, this also allows you to verify contact information and ensure a safe transaction.
8. Negotiate. If you find an artist whose work falls well within your budget, offer to by multiple pieces at a discounted price. Alternately, you could suggest buying successive pieces over time for a predetermined amount.
9. Frame the work yourself. A frame should not only enhance your art, but should also compliment the space in which it hangs. It is also less expensive to buy and ship unframed art.
10. Promote “your” artist after the deal is done. There is a direct correlation between the value of an artwork and the name recognition of the artist who painted it. By encouraging others to explore “your” artist’s work, you increase the value of your personal collection.

The Essentials On Authenticating And Attributing Art

The Essentials On Authenticating And Attributing Art

You can find art for sale almost anywhere, most of it
coupled with a variety of forms of certification,
documentation, authentication, provenance,
attribution, and all other claims that the piece is by
this artist, etc. But guess what? None of these
papers, claims, certificates of authenticity,
documents or even tall tales mean a thing if they’re
not stated, authored, or else traceable to or directly
associated with accepted, recognized, and qualified
authorities about the art in question, and also the
artist themselves.

So here are some of the essentials to know on
attributing and authenticating art, how it works and
who the people to be trusted are.

They’re All Connected-Not!

One of the most pervasive problems in selling art
deals with “attributed” art. It’s so common that every
kind of unqualified individual would attribute
artworks to different kinds of artists, sad to say
100% of these attributions are considered to be
worthless.

How come? Simply because in the art industry,
legitimate attributions are only made by known and
recognized authority figures that have legitimate
authority on the attributed artists’ names.

Defining “Attributed”

Officially and technically speaking, “attributed”
means a specific work of art, which is most likely an
original, is at the hand and is certified by a
qualified authority on the matter. Take note that your
keywords here are “qualified authority”. Thus, if the
attribution is done by an unqualified person, then it
would be meaningless.

Who Are The Qualified Authority?

A qualified authority is someone who really knows what
he/she is talking about and has the proof to anything
he/she says. Qualified authorities are those people
that have deliberately studied the artist under
consideration, have already published papers about the
artist, and have curated major gallery shows or
museums catering the works of the artist.

They can also be someone who have taught courses about
the artist; bought or sold at least dozens or even
hundreds of artworks by the artist; have written
magazine articles, books, or catalogue essays about
the artist, and the like.

The artist him/herself can also be a qualified
authority, along with his relatives, employees, direct
descendants, and heirs. Also, people who have formal,
legal, or estate-granted sanctions or entitlements in
able to pass judgment the artist’s works are
considered to be qualified authorities. Most
importantly, they should be recognized throughout the
whole art community to the people in charge when it
comes to the matter of dealing with works by that
artist.

Who Are Not Qualified?

The list of people whom are not qualified could take
forever to complete. However, here are some of the
general characteristics of those unqualified people
who most likely say that they are qualified.

First off, you should watch out for those who think
that the piece they are selling is by this certain
artist just because the work ‘looks like’ it is done
by that artist; also, those who think that the piece
is by that artist because they saw some illustrations
from art books that are similar to the piece at hand.

Additionally, sellers that answer you with “that is
what the previous owner told me” kind of questions are
not to be trusted. You really can’t rely on
tattle-tailing to very if the work is an original or
not. This is just the same if they say that the work
is by such artist because the previous owner is rich
and famous.

You should also watch out for art appraisers, since
they only appraise and not authenticate; unless they
have qualifications to do so. Take note that appraisal
and authentication are two different things.

So, if you’re planning on buying a so-called original,
then you must make sure that the person you’re talking
to is a qualified authority, or better yet, the artist
himself!

Investing in Australian Aboriginal Art

Investing in Australian Aboriginal Art

One of the hottest areas of the contemporary art scene in Australia today is Australian Aboriginal art, which is becoming an increasingly attractive option for many investors. The Aboriginal art market has attracted increasing international attention in recent years, and has experienced exceptional growth which appears set to maintain pace in the medium term. Aboriginal art considerably outsells non-indigenous Australian art at auction and has gained significant international standing. It is critical that investors are well informed before entering the Aboriginal art market, however, not only to ensure that investments are made in quality work by quality artists, but also to guarantee the provenance and authenticity of the work.

Australian Aboriginal art has generally proved to be a solid investment over time. Work by important Aboriginal artists has increased in value markedly over the past 30 years, with individual works fetching prices as high $350,000 at international auction. Prudent investors who have developed good relationships with specialist galleries can derive great pleasure from collecting the art of the world’s oldest living indigenous culture, and can also be assured that the artists in question have been treated fairly and ethically, and that their investment is secure.

One of the first considerations when investing in Aboriginal art is a Certificate of Authenticity. Certificates are normally issued by the community where the artist lives and paints, or by the gallery from which the artwork is purchased. Certificates vary in the details they provide, however most include information including the artist’s name, community and language group, the title, story and size of the work, and the name and code of the relevant community art centre or gallery. A photo of the artist with the work is also often included with the certificate.

Many of the factors involved in determining the value of an Aboriginal art work are similar to those involved in any other art work. A particular piece should in the first instance be attractive to the investor on the basis of its immediate aesthetic value, but its current and future financial value depend on a variety of factors requiring careful research. These factors include the renown of the artist and the period of the artist’s career in which the work was created. Other factors particular to the Australian Aboriginal art market include the artist’s age and seniority as a tribal elder, and their role or position in the historical development of Aboriginal art.

Prior to purchasing a painting, investors should research the artist in as much depth as possible. Determine whether the artist is represented in significant collections or galleries in Australia and internationally. Also determine how prolific the artist is, and whether there is strong demand for the artist in the secondary market – in other words, at auction. View as much work by the artist as possible to determine whether the work under consideration is from a well regarded period or series. Works painted during particular periods can be significantly more valuable than those from other periods. Finally, make sure you have an accurate understanding of the current market value of the artist’s work.

If all these factors seem daunting, don’t hesitate to ask for professional advice. The Australian Aboriginal art market is far more open than it once was, with increased competition facilitating a marked improvement in service. Reputable gallery owners, dealers and auction houses possess the necessary expertise and are generally happy to assist new investors. One final point to consider when investing in any art are add-on expenses including transaction costs, commissions, insurance and restoration charges. These costs can be high, so be sure to factor them into the purchase price where applicable.

Metal Art Basics

Metal Art Basics

Metal art falls under a few different categories in the art world. Most people would place it in the sculpture box. Metal art is also a little out of the mainstream of art. If you think about it, the main population of artists are painters. Why you ask? Probably because the space, time, and resources that are needed to make the art.

For example, a metal artist needs a metal working shop where a painter only needs a dedicated room or studio. A metal artist also needs to invest in a significant number of metal working machines before he can begin. A painter only needs paint, brushes and a canvas. A bit of a difference huh.

There are 3 main types of metal art:

Casting
Fabricated Sculpture
Metal Junk Art

Cast Metal Art

In casting the metal artist makes a mold of an object. Next, the artist uses a furnace of some sort to melt metal. This metal can be Aluminum, Steel, Bronze or some other metal alloy. The metal artist then pours the molten metal into the mold. The object cools for a period of time and then is released from the mold. Finally the object is cleaned up and sometimes a patina is added. This type of work is very hot and time consuming with multiple steps for the metal artist.

Fabricated Sculpture Metal Art

Fabricated sculptures are a bit different. There is some heat involved, but it is normally from welding different metal pieces together. These sculptures are usually more detailed then cast sculptures. Most times the artist has an idea of what they want to build and then they start assembling it like you would a car or bike.

Metal Junk Art

Some times people even make these sculptures out of junk pieces of metal. I call this “Junk Art” while others call it “Found Object Art.” You make the call. You see this type of metal art at street art fairs quite a bit.

Out of these three types of metal art I prefer fabricated metal art. Not that I think that the art is better. To me it seems there is some more craftsmanship that goes into in. There is a process before hand where the artist has to think a little bit and plan the work.

Metal art does take a little more time, money and effort then other types of art. Part of that is the nature of the work. You need extra machines around because you are working with a tough media. You need a little extra power so you control your metal art instead of it controlling you.